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Apparatus for Accelerating Measurements of Environmentally Assisted Fatigue Crack Growth at Low Frequency

Published

Author(s)

Elizabeth S. Drexler, Joseph D. McColskey, Marc Dvorak, Neha N. Rustagi, Damian S. Lauria, Andrew J. Slifka

Abstract

Testing the fatigue crack growth of materials at low frequencies has been a tug-of-war between the investment of time and starting at high values of the stress intensity factor. Running a test at a frequency less than 1 Hz can take weeks and if meaningful statistics are needed, two to three months might be necessary to provide one set of data on the fatigue crack growth rate. We present here a means of reducing that timeframe by testing as many as ten specimens simultaneously. With this innovative design, compact tension specimens are run in series and according to ASTM Standard E647. Furthermore, there is no need to interrupt the fatigue testing of the linked specimens should one or more finish before the others. We show that specimens tested in this fashion generate consistent data of fatigue crack growth rate.
Citation
Review of Scientific Instruments

Keywords

compact tension specimen, fatigue crack growth rates, FCGR, harsh environments, multiple specimens, pipeline steels

Citation

Drexler, E. , McColskey, J. , Dvorak, M. , Rustagi, N. , Lauria, D. and Slifka, A. (2014), Apparatus for Accelerating Measurements of Environmentally Assisted Fatigue Crack Growth at Low Frequency, Review of Scientific Instruments, [online], https://doi.org/10.1111/ext.12078 (Accessed July 13, 2024)

Issues

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Created March 4, 2014, Updated November 10, 2018