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Anisotropic Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Studies of Ceramics

Published

Author(s)

Andrew J. Allen, Lin-Sien H. Lum, K T. Faber, M H. Zimmerman, Jay S. Wallace

Abstract

This paper discusses how small-angle neutron scattering studies can be applied in two variations to obtain a representative characterization of the large, densely-populated, and anisotropic features that occur in the microstructures of various materials. The use of Porod scattering to amplify the anisotropies that are present, permitting different microstructural components to be identified, is discussed. Measurement of the anisotropic beam-broadening due to multiple small-angle neutron scattering is also described, as is its use to extract mean sizes and volume-fractions for the component microstructures. The work is illustrated by a small-angle scattering study of microcracking in a strongly textured anisotropic ceramic.
Proceedings Title
Advanced Materials for the 21st Century: The 1999 Julia R. Weertman Symposium
Conference Dates
October 31-November 2, 1999
Conference Location
Cincinnati, OH
Conference Title
Advanced Materials for the 21st Century

Keywords

ion titanate, microcracking, microstructure characterization, MSANS, small-angle scattering, textured materials

Citation

Allen, A. , Lum, L. , Faber, K. , Zimmerman, M. and Wallace, J. (1999), Anisotropic Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Studies of Ceramics, Advanced Materials for the 21st Century: The 1999 Julia R. Weertman Symposium, Cincinnati, OH (Accessed May 27, 2024)

Issues

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Created October 1, 1999, Updated February 19, 2017