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Adhesion and Friction Studies of Silicon and Hydrophobic and Low Friction Films and Investigation of Scale Effects

Published

Author(s)

Bharat Bhushan, H Liu, Stephen M. Hsu

Abstract

Tribological properties are crucial to the reliability of microelectromechanical systems/nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS). In this study, adhesion and friction measurements are made at micro- and nanoscales on single-crystal silicon (commonly used in MEMS/NEMS) and hydrophobic and low friction films. These include diamond like carbon (DLC), chemically-bonded perfluoropolyether (PFPE), and self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films. Since MEMS/NEMS devices are expected to be used in various environments, measurements are made at a range of velocities, humidifies, and temperatures. The relevant adhesion and friction mechanisms are discussed. It is found that solid films of DLC, PFPE, and SAM can reduce the adhesion and friction of silicon. These films can be used as anti-adhesion films for MEMS/NEMS components under different environments and operating conditions. Finally, the adhesion and friction data clearly show scale dependence. The scale effects on adhesion and friction are also discussed in the paper.
Citation
Journal of Tribology-Transactions of the Asme
Volume
126
Issue
No. 3

Keywords

adhesion, friction, hydrophobic films, lubricant films, MEMS, scale dependence, silicon

Citation

Bhushan, B. , Liu, H. and Hsu, S. (2004), Adhesion and Friction Studies of Silicon and Hydrophobic and Low Friction Films and Investigation of Scale Effects, Journal of Tribology-Transactions of the Asme (Accessed June 18, 2024)

Issues

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Created June 30, 2004, Updated October 12, 2021