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Wavelength Standards in the Ultraviolet

Published

Author(s)

Gillian Nave, Craig J. Sansonetti

Abstract

We have made accurate wavelength measurements for lines of Pt 1 and II, Fe I, Ge I, and Kr II in the region 1800 to 3100 . New microlithography tools that are currently coming into production use are based on the ArF excimer laser which operates at a wavelength of approximately 1935 (51680 cm-1). Because of the difficulty of producing large aperture achromatic projection optics at this wavelength, it is essential that the laser wavelength be stabilized and known to a high degree of accuracy. Methods for measuring the laser wavelength have been developed using the optogalvanic effect to observe accurately known atomic spectral lines in sealed hollow cathode discharge lamps. We set out to measure seven lines of Fe 1, Ge 1 and Pt I within the tuning range of the ArF laser that can be observed optogalvanically and are suitable as wavelength standards. In the course of this study we compared wavelength calibrations derived from Fe1, Fe 11, Ge 1 and Cu 11 lines and found small but statistically significant differences. We also made accurate new measurements for Pt I and II and Kr II in the region 1800 to 3100 .
Citation
International Conference on Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

Keywords

atomic spectroscopy, Fourier transform spectroscopy, germanium, iron, platinum, ultraviolet, wavelength standards

Citation

Nave, G. and Sansonetti, C. (2002), Wavelength Standards in the Ultraviolet, International Conference on Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (Accessed May 19, 2024)

Issues

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Created September 1, 2002, Updated February 17, 2017