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Transition probabilities of Ce I obtained from Boltzmann analysis of visible and near-infrared emission spectra

Published

Author(s)

David E. Nitz, John J. Curry, M Buuck, A. DeMann, N. Mitchell, W. Shull

Abstract

We report radiative transition probabilities for 5029 emission lines of neutral cerium within the wavelength range 417 to 1110 nm. Transition probabilities for only 4% of these lines have been previously measured. These results are obtained from a Boltzmann analysis of two high resolution Fourier transform emission spectra used in previous studies of cerium, obtained from the digital archives of the National Solar Observatory at Kitt Peak. The set of transition probabilities used for the Boltzmann analysis are those published by Lawler et al. (Atomic transition probabilities of Ce I from Fourier transform spectra, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43, 085701 (2010)). Comparisons of branch ratios and transition probabilities for lines common to the two spectra provide important self-consistency checks and test for the presence of self-absorption effects. Estimated 1 uncertainties for our transition probability results range from 10% to 18%.
Citation
Journal of Physics B-Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics

Keywords

cerium, radiative transition probabilities, emission spectra

Citation

Nitz, D. , Curry, J. , Buuck, M. , DeMann, A. , Mitchell, N. and Shull, W. (2018), Transition probabilities of Ce I obtained from Boltzmann analysis of visible and near-infrared emission spectra, Journal of Physics B-Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=923866 (Accessed April 15, 2024)
Created January 25, 2018, Updated October 12, 2021