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Transient Analysis of Serial Production Lines with Perishable Products: Bernoulli Reliability Model

Published

Author(s)

Feng Ju, Jingshan Li, John A. Horst

Abstract

Manufacturing systems with perishable products are widely observed in practice (e.g., food industry, biochemical productions, battery and semiconductor manufacturing, etc.). In such systems, the quality of the product is highly affected by its exposure time while waiting for the next operation, i.e., the residence time of intermediate parts within the system. Such a time should be strictly limited in order to ensure their usability. The parts that reach the maximum allowable residence time need to be scrapped, thus impeding the production. To achieve an efficient production, the time-dependent or transient analysis is important to uncover the underlying principles governing production operations. In this paper, a serial production line model with two Bernoulli reliability machines, a finite buffer and perishable products is presented to analyze the transient behavior of such systems. The analytical formulas are derived to evaluate transient performance, and structural properties are investigated to study the effect of system parameters. In addition, using the model, we address problems of settling time estimation and production control to demonstrate the importance of the proposed method for transient analysis.
Citation
IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control
Volume
62
Issue
2

Keywords

Transient analysis, perishable part, Bernoulli machine, residence time, settling time, production control
Created February 15, 2017, Updated April 3, 2017