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Thermodynamic and Structural Aspects of the Potential Energy Surface of Simulated Water

Published

Author(s)

Francis W. Starr, Srikanth Sastry, E LaNave, A Scala, H E. Stanley, F Sciortino

Abstract

Relations between the thermodynamics and dynamics of supercooled liquids approaching the glass transition have been propposed over many years. This connections is most obvious at low temperatures where the motion of the system can be partitioned into vibrations withi a basin, and infrequent interbasin transitions. We located the minima sampled by the liquid by quenches from equilibrium configuratons generated via molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the basin energy, degeneracy, and shape. The temperature dependence of theenergy of the minima is qualitatively similar to simple liquids, but has anamolous density dependence. Finally we study the structure of simulated water at the minima, whcihc provides insight on the progressive tetrahedral ordering of the liquid on cooling.
Citation
Physical Review E (Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics)
Volume
63

Keywords

Glass transition, molecular dynamics, potential energy surface, simulations, water

Citation

Starr, F. , Sastry, S. , LaNave, E. , Scala, A. , Stanley, H. and Sciortino, F. (2001), Thermodynamic and Structural Aspects of the Potential Energy Surface of Simulated Water, Physical Review E (Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics), [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=851843 (Accessed May 28, 2024)

Issues

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Created April 1, 2001, Updated February 17, 2017