Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

A Simulation Platform to Study the Human Body Communication Channel

Published

Author(s)

Kamran Sayrafian, Katjana Krhac, Gregory Noetscher, Dina Simunic

Abstract

Human Body Communication (HBC) is an attractive low complexity technology with promising applications in wearable biomedical sensors. In this paper, a simple parametric model based on the finite-element method (FEM) using a full human body model is developed to virtually emulate and examine the HBC channel. FEM allows better modeling and quantification of the underlying physical phenomena including the impact of the human body for the desired applications. By adjusting the parameters of the model, a good match with the limited measurement results in the literature is observed. Having a flexible and customizable simulation platform could be very helpful to better understand the communication medium for capacitively coupled electrodes in HBC. This knowledge, in turn, leads to better transceiver design for given applications. The platform presented here can also be extended to study communication channel characteristics when the HBC mechanism is used by an implant device.
Proceedings Title
IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference
Conference Dates
July 23-26, 2019
Conference Location
Berlin
Conference Title
IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference (EMBC 2019)

Keywords

Human body communication, Computational human body models, Capacitive coupling

Citation

Sayrafian, K. , Krhac, K. , Noetscher, G. and Simunic, D. (2019), A Simulation Platform to Study the Human Body Communication Channel, IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference, Berlin, -1, [online], https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2019.8857883 (Accessed October 22, 2021)
Created October 7, 2019, Updated May 13, 2020