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Semisynthetic zigzag optical lattice for ultracold bosons

Published

Author(s)

Ian B. Spielman, Gediminas Juzeli?nas, Christoph Str?ter, Andr? Eckardt, Mantas Ra?i?nas, Egidijus Anisimovas

Abstract

We consider a one-dimensional "zigzag" lattice, pictured as a two-site wide single strip taken from a triangular lattice, affected by a tunable homogeneous magnetic flux piercing its triangular plaquettes. We focus on a semi-synthetic lattice produced by combining a one-dimensional spin-dependent lattice in the long direction with laser-induced transitions between atomic internal states that define the short synthetic dimension. In contrast to previous studies on semi-synthetic lattices, the atom-atom interactions are nonlocal in both lattice directions. We investigate the ground-state properties of the system for the case of strongly interacting bosons, and find that the interplay between the frustration induced by the magnetic field and the interactions gives rise to an exotic gapped phase at fractional filling factors corresponding to one particle per magnetic unit cell.
Citation
Physical Review A (Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics)

Keywords

Bose-Einstein condensate, Degenerate Fermi Gas, lattice, topology, DMRG

Citation

Spielman, I. , Juzeli?nas, G. , Str?ter, C. , Eckardt, A. , Ra?i?nas, M. and Anisimovas, E. (2016), Semisynthetic zigzag optical lattice for ultracold bosons, Physical Review A (Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics), [online], https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevA.94.063632 (Accessed June 24, 2024)

Issues

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Created December 22, 2016, Updated November 10, 2018