Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Rigidity of the magic pentagram game

Published

Author(s)

Amir Kalev, Carl Miller

Abstract

A game is rigid if a near-optimal score guarantees, under the sole assumption of the validity of quantum mechanics, that the players are using an approximately unique quantum strategy. As such, rigidity has a vital role in quantum cryptography as it permits a strictly classical user to trust behavior in the quantum realm. This property can be traced back as far as 1998 (Mayers and Yao) and has been proved for multiple classes of games. In this paper we prove ridigity for the magic pentagram game, a simple binary constraint satisfaction game involving two players, five clauses and ten variables. We show that all near-optimal strategies for the pentagram game are approximately equivalent to a unique strategy involving real Pauli measurements on three maximally-entangled qubit pairs.
Citation
Quantum Science and Technology
Volume
3

Keywords

Quantum cryptography, nonlocal games

Citation

Kalev, A. and Miller, C. (2017), Rigidity of the magic pentagram game, Quantum Science and Technology, [online], https://doi.org/10.1088/2058-9565/aa931d, https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=922865 (Accessed May 20, 2024)

Issues

If you have any questions about this publication or are having problems accessing it, please contact reflib@nist.gov.

Created November 1, 2017, Updated October 12, 2021