Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

A reversible structural transition in MIL-53 with large temperature hysteresis

Published

Author(s)

Yun Liu, Jae-Hyuk Her, Anne Dailly, A. Ramirez-Cuesta, Dan A. Neumann, Craig Brown

Abstract

The metal-organic framework, MIL-53, can have a structural transition from an open-pored to a closed-pored structure by adsorbing different guest molecules. The aid of guest molecules is believed to be necessary to initiate this "breathing" effect. Using both neutron powder diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering techniques, we find that MIL-53 exhibits a reversible structural transition between an open-pored and a closed-pored structure as a function of temperature without the presence of any guest molecules. Surprisingly, this structural transition shows a significant temperature hysteresis: the transition from the open-pored to closed-pored structure occurs at approximately 125 K to 150 K while the transition from the closed-pored to open-pored structure occurs around 325 K to 375 K. To our knowledge, this is first observation of such a large temperature hysteresis of a structural transition in metal-organic frameworks. We also note that the transition from the open to closed structure at low temperature shows very slow kinetics. An ab-initio computer simulation is employed to investigate the possible mechanism of the transition.
Citation
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Volume
130

Keywords

hydrogen storage, hysteresis, isotherm

Citation

Liu, Y. , Her, J. , Dailly, A. , Ramirez-Cuesta, A. , Neumann, D. and Brown, C. (2008), A reversible structural transition in MIL-53 with large temperature hysteresis, Journal of the American Chemical Society (Accessed April 12, 2024)
Created August 11, 2008, Updated October 12, 2021