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Research and Challenges in Applied Mechanics

Published

Author(s)

K P. Chong, Martin Chiang

Abstract

The United States Government pursues diligent funding of basic research because it confers a preferential economic advantage1. The National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have supported basic research in engineering and the sciences for more than half a century and will continue this mandate in the future. NIST also has the additional missions of providing a variety of standards services in reference materials and data, as well as technology transfer to U.S. industry and the public.Considerable research funding will be directed towards nanoscale, information technology (IT), and bioengineering research, so the challenge to the mechanics and materials research community is to determine the most needed and/or most fruitful avenues of research within these broad-based and diverse research areas. In this presentation, results of relevant NSF workshops on research needs in solid mechanics for nanoscale technology, multiscale modeling and durability predictions are described. Examples of cutting-edge applied mechanics projects at NIST will also be given.
Citation
International Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics
Volume
44(24)

Keywords

adhesion, combinatorial approach, material behavior, nanomechanics, solid mechanics, thin film

Citation

Chong, K. and Chiang, M. (2002), Research and Challenges in Applied Mechanics, International Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=852048 (Accessed April 19, 2024)
Created December 31, 2001, Updated October 12, 2021