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Reproducible Spectral and Hyper-Spectral Analysis using NeXL

Published

Author(s)

Nicholas Ritchie

Abstract

NeXL is a collection of Julia language packages (libraries) for X-ray microanalysis data processing. NeXLCore provides basic atomic and X-ray physics data and models including support for microanalysis-related data types for materials and k-ratios. NeXLMatrixCorrection provides algorithms for matrix correction and iteration. NeXLSpectrum provides utilities and tools for energy dispersive X-ray spectrum and hyper-spectrum analysis including display, manipulation and fitting. NeXL is integrated in with the Julia language infrastructure. NeXL is tightly integrated with the Gadfly plotting library and the DataFrames tabular data library. When combined with the DrWatson package, NeXL can provide a highly reproducible environment in which to process microanalysis data. Data availability and reproducible data analysis are two keys to scientific reproducibility. No only should readers of journal articles have access to the data, they should also be able to reproduce the analysis steps that take the data to final results. This paper will both discuss the NeXL framework and provide examples of how it can used for reproducible data analysis.
Citation
Microscopy and Microanalysis

Keywords

X-Ray Microanalysis

Citation

Ritchie, N. (2001), Reproducible Spectral and Hyper-Spectral Analysis using NeXL, Microscopy and Microanalysis, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=933400 (Accessed May 22, 2024)

Issues

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Created January 1, 2001, Updated November 29, 2022