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Reduction in Dentin Permeability Using a Slurry Containing Dicalcium Phosphate and Calcium Hydroxide

Published

Author(s)

Ai-Shuan(Maria) Cherng, Shozo Takagi, Laurence C. Chow

Abstract

Treatments that obdurate dentin tubules have been used for reducing dentin hypersensitivity. This study was to determine the effect of a treatment with a slurry of micron sized calcium phosphate on the hydraulic conductance (Lp) of etched dentin discs in vitro. The treatment slurry was prepared by mixing a powder mixture of dicalcium phosphate anhydrous and calcium hydroxide (Ca (OH) 2) with a solution that contained NaF and carboxymethyl cellulose. The mean baseline Lp (in L cm-2 sec 1 H2O cm-1) was 2.07 1.45 (mean S.D.; n = 13, L cm-2 sec 1 H2O cm-1= 10.20 in L cm-1 min-1 Kpa- 1). After one treatment and 3, 5, and 8 days of incubation in a saliva like solution (SLS) the mean relative Lp, presented as % of baseline, were 65 16, 42 27, 36 26, and 33 27 (n = 13), respectively. The Lp values of the baseline and treatment after incubation in the SLS were significantly (p
Citation
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research
Volume
78
Issue
2

Keywords

calcium phosphate, dentin permeability, hydraulic conductance, obruration, slurry

Citation

Cherng, A. , Takagi, S. and Chow, L. (2005), Reduction in Dentin Permeability Using a Slurry Containing Dicalcium Phosphate and Calcium Hydroxide, Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=852497 (Accessed May 22, 2024)

Issues

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Created September 9, 2005, Updated February 19, 2017