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Proton NMR Characterization of Room-Temperature Aging After Modest Thermal Cycling in Isotactic Polypropylenes

Published

Author(s)

David L. VanderHart, Chad R. Snyder

Abstract

An proton NMR method, based on simple Bloch-decay spectra in the solid state, is presented that enables one to follow, with excellent sensitivity, structural changes associated with aging in semicrystalline polymers whose Tg is well below the aging temperature. The method is demonstrated for 2 representative isotactic polypropylene (iPP) samples, a Ziegler-Natta and a metallocene product. Starting with samples that had been melt crystallized at a cooling rate of 1 C/min and then aged at ambient temperature for long periods of time, subsequent mild heating cycles between ambient temperature and temperatures below 90 C were applied. Such heating cycles remained more than 70 C below the major crystalline melting temperature for iPP. Aging at 20 C was monitored by NMR over aging times, 10 min 150 ms) value of T1xz, the relaxation along the quantization axis of the toggling frame in a multiple pulse (MP) experiment.
Citation
Macromolecules
Volume
36
Issue
No. 13

Keywords

aging, isotactic polypropylene, morphology, NMR, proton, reversible, secondary crystallization

Citation

VanderHart, D. and Snyder, C. (2003), Proton NMR Characterization of Room-Temperature Aging After Modest Thermal Cycling in Isotactic Polypropylenes, Macromolecules, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=852059 (Accessed May 22, 2024)

Issues

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Created July 1, 2003, Updated February 17, 2017