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A Photoconductivity Technique for the Assessment of Pigment Reactivity

Published

Author(s)

Joannie W. Chin, S J. Scierka, T Kim, Amanda L. Forster

Abstract

Large volumes of titanium dioxide (TiO2) are utilized each year in coatings, sealants, plastics and paper for opacification and pigmentation purposes. It is well known that the photoreactivity of TiO2 can contribute to the degradation of the material that it is dispersed in, due to the generation of electron-hole pairs that further react to form oxidizing and/or reducing agents. A wide range of photoreactivity exists in commercial TiO2 pigments, depending on the manufacturing method used. At the present time, there is no standardized, quantitative measurement technique in the coatings industry for assessing the photoreactivity of pigments. The primary objective of this research is to develop a standardized technique for the measurement of photoreactivity, one with a scientific basis that would provide the most direct correlation to end-use performance. One such technique involves measuring the photoconductivity of the pigments under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. A prototype photoconductivity testing device and preliminary results from a variety of TiO2 systems will be presented.
Citation
FSCT Meeting

Keywords

coating durability, photoconductivity, photoreactivity, titanium dioxide, UV radiation

Citation

Chin, J. , Scierka, S. , Kim, T. and Forster, A. (2003), A Photoconductivity Technique for the Assessment of Pigment Reactivity, FSCT Meeting, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=860523 (Accessed June 25, 2024)

Issues

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Created November 19, 2003, Updated February 19, 2017