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Papers and Proceedings of the Advanced Technology Program's International Conference on the Economic Evaluation of Technological Change

Published

Author(s)

R N. Spivack

Abstract

This publication contains the Papers and Proceedings of the International Conference on the Economic Evaluation of Technological Change. This collection of Papers relates to the evaluation of the Advanced Technology Program (ATP) and selected foreign public investment programs in technology research and development (R&D). The ATP is the nation's civilian technology program charged with improving the competitiveness of U.S. businesses by providing funding for promising high-risk technology R&D that are deemed to be too risky to be supported by the private sector. The common element of all Papers and presentations is an emphasis on the empirical assessment of the effects of government investment in science and technology on advanced industrial economies.Presented papers cover a wide range of topics focusing specifically on the assessment of the effects of government technology investment programs on advanced industrial economies, and identifying outstanding issues in evaluation. The conference succeeded in bringing together from across the U.S. and the rest of the industrialized world government R&D policy-makers, analysts, R&D managers, and academic and other researchers who study technology evaluation issues. The conference advanced the state of the art of evaluating the impact of government investments of the type funded by the U.S. Department of Commerce's Advanced Technology Program in a number of ways, and furthered the dialogue on governments' support for industrial R&D to achieve national and regional economic goals. As anticipated the presentations facilitated comparisons of the evaluation methods and practices of different countries including governments' role in the support of industrial R&D to achieve national and regional economic goals. Papers presented discussed programs in the European Union (EU), Israel, Switzerland, Norway, and Germany.While each of these programs share some common ground with each other, their individual areas of focus are quite distinct. For example, the EU's Fifth Framework Program for Research and Technological Development (RTD) incorporates research themes which are grouped by socio-economic objectives rather than by technology topics as is the case for focused programs in the ATP. Switzerland's program for funding industrial R&D is focused upon fostering collaborations between academic institutions and the private sector, enabling Swiss companies to participate in international R&D programs, providing training for small- and mid-size businesses, and supporting specific industry sectors. The ATP also encourages collaboration, but technology transfer from universities to industry is not the central thrust of the program. Norway's emphasis is on involving users of technology in directing the research projects, while the ATP's focus is upon the innovator. Germany's Science and Technology program underscores the environment shaping conditions (market institutions that influence innovation) of its programs while the ATP's institution-building role is more direct.
Citation
Special Publication (NIST SP) - 952
Report Number
952

Keywords

advanced industrial economies, Advanced Technology Program, government technology investment, technological change, technology research and development

Citation

Spivack, R. (2001), Papers and Proceedings of the Advanced Technology Program's International Conference on the Economic Evaluation of Technological Change, Special Publication (NIST SP), National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (Accessed May 29, 2023)
Created July 1, 2001, Updated October 16, 2008