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Octave-spanning supercontinuum generation via microwave frequency multiplication

Published

Author(s)

Daniel C. Cole, Katja M. Beha, Scott B. Papp, Scott A. Diddams

Abstract

We demonstrate a system based on telecom components for the generation of an octave-spanning supercontinuum from a continuous-wave laser. The system utilizes direct multiplication of the 10 GHz signal derived from a synthesizer. Pulses are carved from the continuous-wave laser and are then iteratively chirped and compressed in two stages. After reducing the repetition rate of the resulting pulse train to 2.5 GHz using selective transmission through an electro-optic gate, propagation through highly-nonlinear fiber generates an octave-spanning supercontinuum spectrum. We discuss the impact of the multiplication of the noise of the microwave frequency on the coherence of the supercontinuum, and present a technique for its mitigation. Close correspondence between experiment and theory is shown throughout the experiment, and we use this ability to precisely model the experiment to propose an extension of the system to 20 GHz repetition rate.
Proceedings Title
“Journal of Physics: Conference Series”
Conference Dates
October 12-16, 2015
Conference Location
Potsdam
Conference Title
8th Symposium on Frequency Standards and Metrology

Keywords

Supercontinuum generation, optical frequency metrology, electro-optic modulation, optical frequency comb

Citation

Cole, D. , Beha, K. , Papp, S. and Diddams, S. (2015), Octave-spanning supercontinuum generation via microwave frequency multiplication, “Journal of Physics: Conference Series”, Potsdam, -1 (Accessed April 24, 2024)
Created October 12, 2015, Updated February 19, 2017