Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Numerical Simulations of Subcritical Crack Growth by Stress Corrosion in an Elastic Solid

Published

Author(s)

Z Tang, A F. Bower, Tze J. Chuang

Abstract

A front-tracking finite element method is used to compute the evolution of a crack-like defect that propagates by stress driven corrosion in an isotropic, linear elastic solid. Depending on material properties, loading, and temperature, we observe three possible behaviors for the flaw: (I) gross blunting at the crack tip; (ii) stable, quasi-steady state notch like growth; and (iii) unstable sharpening of the crack tip. The range of material parameters and loadings that cause each type of behavior is computed. Our results also confirm the existence of a threshold stress level (known as the fatigue limit) which leads to crack sharpening and ultimately to catastrophic fracture. Contrary to earlier predictions, however, our simulation sow that the fatigue threshold is determined not only by the driving force for crack extension but also by the kinetics associated with the chemical reaction at the crack tip. Our results suggest that the fatigue threshold is likely to decrease as temperature is reduced.
Citation
Multiscale Deformation and Fracture in Materials and Structures

Keywords

advanced ceramics, charles-hillig theory, chemical attacks, finite-element method, glass fibers, static fatigue limit, stress corrosion

Citation

Tang, Z. , Bower, A. and Chuang, T. (2000), Numerical Simulations of Subcritical Crack Growth by Stress Corrosion in an Elastic Solid, Multiscale Deformation and Fracture in Materials and Structures (Accessed June 8, 2023)
Created December 1, 2000, Updated February 19, 2017