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Numerical Simulations of the Growth and Deflection of a Stress-Corrosion Crack on the Interface Between Two Brittle Solids

Published

Author(s)

Z Tang, A F. Bower, Tze J. Chuang

Abstract

A front-tracking finite element method is used to compute the evolution of a crack-like defect that propagates along a bi-material interface by stress driven corrosion. Depending on material properties, loading, and temperature, simulations predict five possible behaviors for the flaw: (a) The crack may blunt, so that a fatigue threshold exists for the composite; (b) The crack may branch out of the interface, and thereafter propagate as a stable notch: (c) The crack may branch out of the interface, and then progressively sharpen at its tip, with both the crack tip curvature and stress approaching unbounded values; (d) The crack may propagate as a stable notch parallel to the interface; (e) The crack may propagate parallel to the interface, but with the crack tip curvature and stress progressively increasing without limit. The range of material parameters and loading conditions that leads to each type of behavior is calculated. For conditions where steady-state interfacial crack growth occurs, the crack tip velocity is computed as a function of material and loading.
Citation
International Congress of Fracture

Keywords

crack branching, finite element technique, interfacial crack, notch growth, rate theory, stress corrosion

Citation

Tang, Z. , Bower, A. and Chuang, T. (2017), Numerical Simulations of the Growth and Deflection of a Stress-Corrosion Crack on the Interface Between Two Brittle Solids, International Congress of Fracture (Accessed April 22, 2024)
Created February 19, 2017