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Modification of magnetotransport properties across patterned GaMnAs nanoconstrictions by application of high current densities

Published

Author(s)

David P. Pappas, Fabio Cesar Da Silva, Teresa Osminer, Sung Un Cho, Hyung Choi, Chan Yang, Yun Park

Abstract

We report on the modification of magnetotransport properties across patterned GaMnAs nanoconstrictions by the application of high current densities (< 107 A/cm2). We observe controllable changes in the electrical resistance with the direction of the bias current. Repeated biases at high current densities increase the constriction resistance by 300%. Subsequent biasing and magnetotransport measurements show nearly a four-fold increase in the magnetoresistances and large changes in the magnetic switching behavior of GaMnAs. The observed changes cannot be explained solely on the basis of local annealing caused by Joule heating effects. The initial reversibility of the changes in resistance suggests that dopant electromigration may locally alter the interstitial concentrations of Mn at the nanoconstriction.
Citation
Applied Physics Letters
Volume
95

Keywords

ferromagnetic semiconductor, nano-wires, GaMnAs, magnetotransport, nanoconstrictions

Citation

Pappas, D. , , F. , Osminer, T. , , S. , Choi, H. , Yang, C. and Park, Y. (2009), Modification of magnetotransport properties across patterned GaMnAs nanoconstrictions by application of high current densities, Applied Physics Letters, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=901893 (Accessed May 29, 2024)

Issues

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Created July 17, 2009, Updated February 17, 2017