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Modelling Dynamic Aerosol Processes for Indoor Ultrafine Particles

Published

Author(s)

Dong H. Rim, Lance L. Wallace, Andrew K. Persily, Jung I. Choi

Abstract

This study has investigated aerosol transformation processes for four common sources of indoor ultrafine particles (UFP): gas stove, electric stove, candle, and hair dryer. For each of the four UFP sources, the temporal change in particle size distribution (3 nm to 100 nm) was measured during particle decay. An analytical model was developed based on the discrete general dynamic mass-balance equation considering coagulation, deposition, and ventilation. The results indicate that in addition to particle deposition and ventilation loss, coagulation is a dominant physical process for changes in indoor UFP size distributions. Especially at high UFP concentrations, coagulation was found to be a dominant process that transforms small particles to larger sizes in a short time.
Proceedings Title
The 12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate- International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate
Conference Dates
June 5-10, 2011
Conference Location
Austin, TX
Conference Title
Indoor Air 2011

Keywords

Indoor aerosol, Ultrafine particles, Coagulation, Deposition, Aerosol Process

Citation

Rim, D. , Wallace, L. , Persily, A. and Choi, J. (2011), Modelling Dynamic Aerosol Processes for Indoor Ultrafine Particles, The 12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate- International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate, Austin, TX, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=907741 (Accessed June 23, 2024)

Issues

If you have any questions about this publication or are having problems accessing it, please contact reflib@nist.gov.

Created June 5, 2011, Updated June 2, 2021