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Modeling the Influence of Crack Path Deviations on the Propagation of Stress Corrosion Cracks

Published

Author(s)

Richard E. Ricker

Abstract

Stress corrosion cracks typically nucleate at a stress concentration in the surface and propagate away from the surface on a plane perpendicular to the applied stress. While this is a good macroscopic description of crack propagation, on a microscopic scale, crack tips regularly deviate from this ideal orientation due to the deviations in the preferred microstructural paths for crack propagation and microstructural obstacles. These crack path deviations can be influenced by grain boundary size, shape, and crystallographic texture and may or may not have a significant influence on the accuracy of crack propagation rate measurements or the predictions of propagation rate models. This paper examines the effects that crack path deviations can have on measuring and modeling stress corrosion crack propagation by developing a technique for quantifying these deviations and estimating the difference between the measured and the true rate of crack tip propagation.
Proceedings Title
Conf Proceedings Hydrogen Effects in Metals/Corrosion Deformation Intgeractions
Conference Dates
September 22-26, 2002
Conference Title
Hydrogen Effects in Metals Corrosion Deformation Interactions Conference

Keywords

crack propagation, hydrogen embrittlement, stress corrosion cracking, stress intensity factor

Citation

Ricker, R. (2003), Modeling the Influence of Crack Path Deviations on the Propagation of Stress Corrosion Cracks, Conf Proceedings Hydrogen Effects in Metals/Corrosion Deformation Intgeractions, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=853221 (Accessed June 15, 2024)

Issues

If you have any questions about this publication or are having problems accessing it, please contact reflib@nist.gov.

Created December 1, 2003, Updated February 17, 2017