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Minimizing Throttline Losses in the Refrigeration Cycle

Published

Author(s)

Piotr A. Domanski

Abstract

Most alternative non-CFC refrigerants have a large molecular structure and large heat capacity, which influence the slope of saturated liquid line and result in substantial throttling losses in a basic reversed Rankine cycle. These losses degrade the cycle efficiency below that of the original CFC fluids; virtually all carbon-based non-hydrocarbon refrigerants have a lower Coefficient of Performance than the fluids banned by the Montreal Protocol. This study analyzes the performance of pure-component refrigerants in the basic refrigeration (reversed Rankine) cycle and in three modified cycles in which the throttling-process irreversibilities are minimized: the liquid-line/suction-line heat exchange (llsl-hx) cycle, the economizer cycle, and the ejector cycle. The refrigerants considered in this study were the 38 fluids covered by REFPROP /1/, and REFROP property routines were employed in performance simulations. The Carnahan-Starling-DeSantis equation of state was applied for all fluids except ammonia, for which a formulation by Harr and Gallagher was used.
Proceedings Title
International Conference of Refrigeration, 19th Proceedings
Conference Dates
August 1, 1995
Conference Location
Hague,

Keywords

refrigeration, air conditioning, economizer, ejector, liquid-line/suction-line heat exchanger, Rankine cycle, vapor compression cycle

Citation

Domanski, P. (1995), Minimizing Throttline Losses in the Refrigeration Cycle, International Conference of Refrigeration, 19th Proceedings, Hague, , [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=910532 (Accessed March 3, 2024)
Created August 1, 1995, Updated June 2, 2021