Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

The Microstructure of Portland Cement-Based Materials: Computer Simulation and Percolation Theory

Published

Author(s)

Edward J. Garboczi, Dale P. Bentz

Abstract

Cement-based materials are usually composites, where the matrix consists of cement paste. Cement paste is a material formed from the hydration reaction of cement, usually a calcium silicate material, with water. The microstructure of cement paste changes drastically over a time period of about one week, with slower changes occurring over subsequent weeks to months. The effect of this hydration process on the changing microstucture can be represented using computer simulation techniques applied to three-dimensional digital-image-based models. Percolation theory can be used to understand the evolving microstructure in terms of the three percolation thresholds that are of importance in the cement paste microstructure: the set point, capilary porosity percolation, and the percolation of the C-S-H phase.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the Spring 1998 Materials Research Society on Computational Materials Science
Volume
529
Conference Dates
April 13-17, 1998
Conference Title
Materials Research Society

Keywords

building technology, cement paste, composites, computer simulation, percolation

Citation

Garboczi, E. and Bentz, D. (1998), The Microstructure of Portland Cement-Based Materials: Computer Simulation and Percolation Theory, Proceedings of the Spring 1998 Materials Research Society on Computational Materials Science, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=860149 (Accessed June 16, 2024)

Issues

If you have any questions about this publication or are having problems accessing it, please contact reflib@nist.gov.

Created April 1, 1998, Updated February 19, 2017