Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Measurement Techniques of Low Value High Current Single Range Current Shunts 15 Amps to 3000 Amps

Published

Author(s)

Marlin E. Kraft

Abstract

Standard resistors that are used to measure current and are designed to dissipate relatively high levels of power are known as current shunts. This paper will discuss some of the many different types of single range current shunts in use today, and describe self-heating effects and the kinds of errors associated with specific current shunt designs. The importance of the length of time it takes for some shunts to reach both temperature equilibrium and resistance equilibrium will be discussed. Because of the effects of non-uniform temperature distribution, these are not the same length of time for some shunts and may depend on the location of the temperature sensor. Other topics include how errors in measuring current shunts can be reduced by making symmetric, low-resistance connections and considering how the current distribution and the placement of the potential terminals affect the measurement.
Proceedings Title
Conference Proceedings of NCSL International Workshop and Symposium
Conference Dates
August 6-10, 2006
Conference Location
Nashville, TN
Conference Title
NCSL International Workshop and Symposium

Keywords

current, equilibrium, self-heating, Shunts, standard resistor, thermocouple

Citation

Kraft, M. (2006), Measurement Techniques of Low Value High Current Single Range Current Shunts 15 Amps to 3000 Amps, Conference Proceedings of NCSL International Workshop and Symposium, Nashville, TN, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=32286 (Accessed July 14, 2024)

Issues

If you have any questions about this publication or are having problems accessing it, please contact reflib@nist.gov.

Created August 1, 2006, Updated January 27, 2020