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Manipulation of adhesion via sub-surface patterning

Published

Author(s)

John A. Howarter, Peter M. Johnson, Jun Y. Chung, Christopher Stafford

Abstract

The delamination characteristics of patterned and hierarchical interfaces are of great interest due to the advanced adhesion capabilities found with many biological surfaces. Using nature-inspired design principles, micro- and nanostrucutred surfaces have been shown to significantly alter the adhesive performance of a given material. In-plane patterning, whether chemical or physical is a simple method of creating a heterogeneous interface, thus disrupting or altering the adhesion and delamination events during separation. However, nature is considerably more complex, often relying on hierarchical structures and gradients in mechanical properties. We synthesized model surfaces which have discrete modulus variation in-plane and through depth to investigate the effect of sub-surface texture on the adhesive performance. We use a modified cantilever peel adhesion test to correlate the energy to fracture with the morphology of the advancing crack front.
Proceedings Title
Adhesion Society Extended Abstracts
Conference Dates
February 13-16, 2011
Conference Location
Savannah, GA, US
Conference Title
2011 Annual Meeting of the Adhesion Society

Keywords

adhesion, fracture, patterns, peel, surface, polymers

Citation

Howarter, J. , Johnson, P. , Chung, J. and Stafford, C. (2011), Manipulation of adhesion via sub-surface patterning, Adhesion Society Extended Abstracts, Savannah, GA, US, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=907545 (Accessed June 19, 2024)

Issues

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Created February 12, 2011, Updated October 14, 2021