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Josephson Arbitrary Waveform Synthesizer as a Reference Standard for the Measurement of the Phase of Harmonics in Distorted Waveforms

Published

Author(s)

Dimitrios Georgakopoulos, Ilya F. Budovsky, Samuel Benz, G. Gubler

Abstract

We have used the Josephson arbitrary waveform synthesizer (JAWS) to provide traceability for the phase of the harmonics, relative to its fundamental, of a distorted waveform. For distorted waveforms with rms values from 0.154 V to 0.2 V and harmonic magnitudes from 5% to 40% of the fundamental, our system can generate odd harmonics up to the 39th with phase uncertainties from 0.002° to 0.010° (k=2.0), depending on the harmonic number and harmonic magnitude. We anticipate that the ability of the JAWS to generate distorted waveforms with the lowest possible uncertainty in the magnitude and phase spectra will make it a unique tool for low- frequency spectrum analysis.
Citation
IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement
Volume
68
Issue
6

Keywords

Digital-analog conversion, Josephson arrays, Quantization, Signal synthesis, Standards, Superconducting integrated circuits, Voltage measurement, Power Measurement

Citation

Georgakopoulos, D. , Budovsky, I. , Benz, S. and Gubler, G. (2018), Josephson Arbitrary Waveform Synthesizer as a Reference Standard for the Measurement of the Phase of Harmonics in Distorted Waveforms, IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement, [online], https://doi.org/10.1109/TIM.2018.2877828, https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=926251 (Accessed May 24, 2024)

Issues

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Created November 13, 2018, Updated October 12, 2021