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Irreversible thermodynamics of creep in crystalline solids

Published

Author(s)

Yuri Mishin, James A. Warren, Robert F. Sekerka, William J. Boettinger

Abstract

We develop an irreversible thermodynamics framework for the description of creep deformation in crystalline solids by mechanisms that involve vacancy diffusion and lattice site generation and annihilation. The material undergoing the creep deformation is treated as a non-classical, non- hydrostatically stressed multi-component solid medium with non-conserved lattice sites. Phase fields describe microstructure evolution and the associated redistribution of vacancy sinks and sources in the material during the creep process. We derive a general expression for the entropy production rate and use it to identify of the relevant fluxes and driving forces and to formulate phenomenoligical relations among them taking into account symmetry properties of the material. As a simple application, we analyze a one-dimensional model of a bicrystal in which the grain boundary acts as a sink and source of vacancies. The kinetic equations of the model describe a creep deformation process accompanied by grain boundary migration and relative rigid translations of the grains. They also demonstrate the effect of grain boundary migration induced by a vacancy concentration gradient across the boundary.
Citation
Physical Review B

Keywords

Irreversible thermodynamics, creep deformation, diffusion, lattice sites, phase field

Citation

Mishin, Y. , Warren, J. , Sekerka, R. and Boettinger, W. (2013), Irreversible thermodynamics of creep in crystalline solids, Physical Review B (Accessed June 13, 2021)
Created November 15, 2013, Updated March 10, 2020