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The Interface Development for Machine Shop Simulation

Published

Author(s)

Yan Luo, Yung-Tsun T. Lee

Abstract

Modeling and simulation technology is recognized for facilitating training, reducing production cost, improving product quality, and shortening development time. However, this technology remains largely underutilized by industry today. This is because custom simulator development is complex and costly, and custom translators are needed to run commercial simulation software. United information models and standard interfaces could help address these problems. A machine shop information model, developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, provides neutral data interfaces for integrating machine shop software applications with simulation. The interfaces include organizations, calendars, work, resources, schedules, parts, process plans, and layout within a machine shop environment. The model is represented by Extensible Markup Language (XML) and Unified Modelling Language. This paper briefly presents the machine shop information model, introduces a data transfer mechanism between the machine shop database and XML document, and discusses data translators, and data import and export base on the model.
Citation
International Journal of Machine Tools & Manufacture
Volume
1:3/4

Keywords

data export, data import, interface, modelling, simulation, UML, Unified Modelling Language, XML

Citation

Luo, Y. and Lee, Y. (2006), The Interface Development for Machine Shop Simulation, International Journal of Machine Tools & Manufacture, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=822637 (Accessed March 1, 2024)
Created October 1, 2006, Updated February 19, 2017