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Hydration Water Freezing in Single Supported Lipid Bilayers

Published

Author(s)

Laura Toppozini, Clare L. Armstrong, Martin D. Kaye, Madhu Sudan Tyagi, Timothy Jenkins, Maikel C. Rheinstadter

Abstract

We present a high temperature and high energy resolution neturon scattering investigation of hydration water freezing in single supported lipid bilayers. Single supported lipid bilayers provide a well defined biological interface to study hydroation water dynamics and coupling to membrane degrees of freedom. Nanosecond molecular motions of membrane and hydration water were studied in the temperature 240 K< T<290 K in slow heating and cooling cycles using coherent and incoherent elastic neutron scattering on a backscattering spectrometer. Several freezing and melting transitions were observed. From the length scale dependence of the elastic scattering these transitions could be assigned to freezing and melting of the hydration water dynamics, diffusive lipid and lipid acyl-tail dynamics. Coupling was investigasted by comparing the different freezing and melting temperatures. While it is often speculated that membrance and hydration water dynamics are strongly coupled, we find that membrane and hydration water dynamics are at least partially de-coupled in single bilayers.
Citation
ISRN Biophysics
Volume
2012

Keywords

Neutron scattering, Lipid Bilayer, hydration water, Dynamics

Citation

Toppozini, L. , Armstrong, C. , Kaye, M. , Tyagi, M. , Jenkins, T. and Rheinstadter, M. (2012), Hydration Water Freezing in Single Supported Lipid Bilayers, ISRN Biophysics, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=910798 (Accessed April 24, 2024)
Created February 29, 2012, Updated October 12, 2021