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High-Speed Microvideography Observations of the Periodic Catastrophic Shear Event in Cutting AISI 1045 Steel

Published

Author(s)

Jarred C. Heigel, Eric P. Whitenton

Abstract

Several theories exist concerning the chip formation process. These theories are used in metal cutting modeling, which is a useful tool to better understand the cutting process and to more efficiently predict the optimal cutting conditions. However, these theories and models are often derived from indirect measurements of the chip formation process, such as forces and vibrations, and from direct measurements of the post-process chips. Consequently, many of the theories are difficult to prove due to the lack of in-situ data of the chip formation process. The purpose of this paper is two-fold: to illustrate the capabilities of using two different high-speed microvideography camera systems to observe the cutting zone, and to provide qualitative observations of the catastrophic shear event.
Proceedings Title
Transactions of the North American Manufacturing Research Institution of SME 2009
Volume
37
Conference Dates
May 19-22, 2009
Conference Location
Greenville, SC
Conference Title
Thirty-Seventh Annual North American Manufacturing Research Conference

Keywords

Microvideography, segmentation, catastrophic shear, AISI 1045 steel

Citation

Heigel, J. and Whitenton, E. (2009), High-Speed Microvideography Observations of the Periodic Catastrophic Shear Event in Cutting AISI 1045 Steel, Transactions of the North American Manufacturing Research Institution of SME 2009, Greenville, SC, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=901359 (Accessed April 18, 2024)
Created May 1, 2009, Updated February 19, 2017