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High Field X-Ray Diffraction Studies on Gd5(Ge2-xFex)Si2 (x = 0.05 and 0.2)

Published

Author(s)

Jim L. Her, Keiichi Koyama, Kazuo Watanabe, Virgil Provenzano, F Fu, Robert D. Shull

Abstract

We performed the X-ray diffraction measurements in magnetic fields up to 5 T for Gd5(Ge1.95Fe0.05)Si2 and Gd5(Ge1.8Fe0.2)Si2 which are noted recently as related materials for magnetic refrigerants. With heating from 8 K, the matrix of Gd5(Ge1.95Fe0.05)Si2 shows clearly a structural transition from an orthorhombic to a monoclinic structure at the vicinity of the Curie temperature (TC = 276 K). On the other hand, the matrix of Gd5(Ge1.8Fe0.2)Si2 with the orthorhombic structure in ferromagnetic state shows two phases co-existence of the orthorhombic and the monoclinic structures above TC = 303 K, indicating that a small amount of the matrix participates in phase transformation. By applying magnetic fields, the monoclinic structure is suppressed but the orthorhombic structure is enhanced for both samples just above TC, which closely relates to the magnetization process.
Citation
Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A-Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science

Keywords

ferromagnetic, magnetic refrigerants, monoclinic structure, orthorhombic, x-ray diffraction

Citation

Her, J. , Koyama, K. , Watanabe, K. , Provenzano, V. , Fu, F. and Shull, R. (2005), High Field X-Ray Diffraction Studies on Gd<sub>5</sub>(Ge<sub>2-x</sub>Fe<sub>x</sub>)Si<sub>2</sub> (x = 0.05 and 0.2), Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A-Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=853392 (Accessed February 28, 2024)
Created September 14, 2005, Updated October 12, 2021