Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Geometric Interoperability via Queries

Published

Author(s)

Vijay Srinivasan

Abstract

The problem of geometric (model and system) interoperability is a non-trivial generalization of the classical problem of part interchangeability in mechanical assemblies. Interoperability subsumes the challenging problems of geometric model quality, exchange, and interchangeability, as well as system integration. Until now, most of the interoperability solutions adopted a data-centric approach that requires exchange and translation of standardized file formats and/or computer representations. The difficulties with a data-centric approach include lack of consistent supporting mathematical models, high overhead in supporting new representations, and inability to provide local, adaptable, and incremental interoperability solutions. We adopt an alternative approach to interoperability using queries: formally specified computable functions that are widely supported by different systems. We propose a hierarchy of such queries and demonstrate that they are adequate to provide interoperable solutions to many common geometric tasks in computer aided design and manufacturing, including model acquisition and exchange, metrology, and also computer aided design/analysis integration.
Citation
Computer Aided Design

Keywords

geometric, Interoperability

Citation

Srinivasan, V. (2014), Geometric Interoperability via Queries, Computer Aided Design, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=914283 (Accessed May 24, 2024)

Issues

If you have any questions about this publication or are having problems accessing it, please contact reflib@nist.gov.

Created May 19, 2014, Updated January 27, 2020