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Fatigue Crack Growth Modeling of Pipeline Steels in High Pressure Gaseous Hydrogen

Published

Author(s)

Robert L. Amaro, Elizabeth S. Drexler, Andrew J. Slifka

Abstract

Hydrogen will likely play a key role in a future clean energy economy. However, fundamental understanding of the deleterious effects of hydrogen on the fatigue and fracture properties of pipeline steels is lacking. Furthermore, engineering tools for design and lifetime prediction of pipeline steels in gaseous hydrogen are yet to be developed and implemented into national codes. A constitutive model which couples deformation and hydrogen-diffusion, supporting a phenomenological predictive model for fatigue crack growth is presented for pipeline steels in high-pressure gaseous hydrogen. The semi-empirical model is predicated upon the hypothesis that one of two mechanisms dominates the fatigue crack growth response, depending upon the applied load and the material’s hydrogen concentration. The model correlates test results well, as well as elucidates how the deformation mechanisms contribute to fatigue crack propagation in pipeline steels in environments similar to those found in-service.
Citation
International Journal of Fatigue
Volume
62

Keywords

hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth, high pressure hydrogen, fatigue crack growth modeling

Citation

Amaro, R. , Drexler, E. and Slifka, A. (2013), Fatigue Crack Growth Modeling of Pipeline Steels in High Pressure Gaseous Hydrogen, International Journal of Fatigue, [online], https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfatigue.2013.10.013 (Accessed May 24, 2024)

Issues

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Created October 21, 2013, Updated November 10, 2018