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Facial Shape Analysis and Sizing System

Published

Author(s)

Afzal A. Godil

Abstract

The understanding of shape and size of the human head and faces is vital for design of facial wear products, such as respirators, helmets, eyeglasses and for ergonomic studies. 3D scanning is used to create 3D databases of thousands of humans from different demographics backgrounds. 3D scans have been used for design and analysis of facial wear products, but have not been very effectively utilized for sizing system. The 3D scans of human bodies contain over hundreds of thousand grid points. To be used effectively for analysis and design, these human heads require a compact shape representation. We have developed compact shape representations of head and facial shapes. We propose a sizing system based on cluster analysis along with compact shape representations to come up with different sizes for different facial wear products, such as respirators, helmets, eyeglasses, etc.
Proceedings Title
13th International Conference onHuman-Computer Interaction
Volume
5620/2009
Conference Dates
July 19-24, 2009
Conference Location
San Diego, CA
Conference Title
2nd International Conference on Digital Human Modeling

Keywords

Anthropometry, shape descriptor, cluster analysis, PCA, spherical harmonics

Citation

Godil, A. (2009), Facial Shape Analysis and Sizing System, 13th International Conference onHuman-Computer Interaction, San Diego, CA, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=902215 (Accessed June 25, 2024)

Issues

If you have any questions about this publication or are having problems accessing it, please contact reflib@nist.gov.

Created July 24, 2009, Updated February 19, 2017