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Experimental Study of Caesium 6PJ+ 6PJ -->7PJ? + 6S energy pooling collisions and modeling of the excited atom density in the presence of optical pumping and radiation trapping

Published

Author(s)

F D. Tomasi, J Huennekens, Zeina J. Kubarych, A Allegrini, A Fioretti, P Verker, S Milosevic

Abstract

An experimental study of caesium energy pooling collisions at thermal energies, has been carried out in a capillary cell using diode laser excitation. Use of the capillary cell minimizes the effects of radiation trapping, but nonetheless, such effects still play a significant role in the analysis. Consequently, a rate equation model, which treats simultaneous effects of saturation, optical pumping, and radiation trapping, has been developed and is used to determine the Cs(6Pj) atom density under these experimental conditions. The excited atom densities are combined with measured fluorescence ratios to determine rate coefficients for the caesium energy pooling process. Our values for these rate coefficients are in agreement, within combined error bars, with values we have recently obtained under very different experimental conditions.
Citation
Journal of Physics B-Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics
Volume
30

Keywords

Atomic collision, Laser spectroscopy

Citation

Tomasi, F. , Huennekens, J. , Kubarych, Z. , Allegrini, A. , Fioretti, A. , Verker, P. and Milosevic, S. (1997), Experimental Study of Caesium 6PJ+ 6PJ -->7PJ? + 6S energy pooling collisions and modeling of the excited atom density in the presence of optical pumping and radiation trapping, Journal of Physics B-Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics (Accessed April 18, 2024)
Created July 4, 1997, Updated October 12, 2021