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Difficulties Making Reliability Predictions For Si, GaAs, and Inp

Published

Author(s)

Grady S. White, L M. Braun

Abstract

The lifetime prediction model that has been developed for brittle materials implicitly assumes an initial flaw population from which, under the influence of an applied or residual stress, cracks grow to failure. The relationship between crack growth rate and stress intensity factor is assumed to be a power law expression. While the tests used to predict lifetimes, i.e., Weibull distribution, inert strength, and dynamic fatigue, can all be applied to semiconductors without apparent discrepancies, anaysis of the crack growth behavior in Si, GaAs, and InP show that assumptions in the lifetime model are violated for these materials. Consequently, lifetime predictions based upon this model will be wrong
Proceedings Title
Optical Fiber and Fiber Component Mechanical Reliability and Testing, Conference || Optical Fiber and Fiber Component Mechanical Reliability and Testing, Conference | SPIE
Volume
4215
Conference Dates
November 1, 2000
Conference Title
Proceedings of SPIE--the International Society for Optical Engineering

Keywords

crack growth, failure mechanism, GaAs, InP, lifetime, reliability, semiconductor, Si

Citation

White, G. and Braun, L. (2001), Difficulties Making Reliability Predictions For Si, GaAs, and Inp, Optical Fiber and Fiber Component Mechanical Reliability and Testing, Conference || Optical Fiber and Fiber Component Mechanical Reliability and Testing, Conference | SPIE (Accessed May 28, 2024)

Issues

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Created April 1, 2001, Updated February 19, 2017