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Detection and spectral measurement of single photons in communication bands using up-conversion technology

Published

Author(s)

Xiao Tang, Oliver T. Slattery, Lijun Ma

Abstract

Quantum information systems are commonly operated in conventional communication bands (1310 and 1550 nm) over an optical fiber to take advantage of low transmission loss. However, the detection and spectral measurement of single photons in these communication bands are limited due to high noise and low sensitivity of single photon detectors in the wavelength ranges. To demonstrate high efficiency detection and high sensitivity spectral measurement, we have implemented a single photon detector and a spectrometer based on frequency up-conversion technology. This detector and spectrometer uses a 5-cm periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide and a tunable pump laser around 1550 nm, to convert signal photons around 1310 nm to 710 nm. The converted photons are then detected by a silicon-based avalanche photodiode (APD). The overall detection efficiency of the single photon detector is as high as 32%, which is three times higher than commercial InGaAs APDs. The sensitivity of the spectrometer is measured to be -126 dBm, which is at least three orders-of-magnitude better than any commercial optical spectrum analyzer in this wavelength range.
Citation
Laser Physics
Volume
20

Citation

Tang, X. , Slattery, O. and Ma, L. (2010), Detection and spectral measurement of single photons in communication bands using up-conversion technology, Laser Physics, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=904204 (Accessed February 27, 2024)
Created April 2, 2010, Updated February 19, 2017