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Deformation of Adaptive Materials Part III: Deformation of Crystals with Polytwin Product Phases

Published

Author(s)

Alexander L. Roytburd, Julia Slutsker

Abstract

Deformation as a result of solid-solid phase transformations, particularly martensitic, is a subject of this paper. The thermodynamic theory of elastic domains is applied to a transformation with a polytwin product phase, which consists of two or more different domains (twins) forming plane-parallel alterations. The volume fractions of the phases and different twin components in the product phase are obtained as functions of applied stress (strain) and temperature. It is shown that during stress- or strain-induced transformation a product phase becomes incompatible with an initial phase. This fact leads to intrinsic instability of a transformational deformation. It is appeared as a negative Young s modulus under strain-controlled deformation and a thermodynamic hysteresis under stress-controlled deformation. The deformation is irreversible also due to microstructure irreversibility of the transformation from a polytwin state to a single domain state. The superelastic deformation due to martensitic transformation is discussed as an application of the presented theory.
Citation
Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids
Volume
49
Issue
No. 8

Keywords

adaptive materials, elastic moduli, non-convex free energy, phase transformations, stress-strain relations, superelasticity

Citation

Roytburd, A. and Slutsker, J. (2001), Deformation of Adaptive Materials Part III: Deformation of Crystals with Polytwin Product Phases, Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids (Accessed March 3, 2024)
Created August 1, 2001, Updated February 17, 2017