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Database-Assisted Design, Standardization, and Wind Direction Effects - Closure

Published

Author(s)

A Rigato, P Chang, Emil Simiu

Abstract

The writers present a simple methodology, developed for use in design assisted by electronic acrodynamic and climatological databases (for short, database-assisted design), that allows a realistic assessment of wind directionality effects. The methodology is applied to typical low-rise industrial steel frame buildings with a rectangular-shape in plan, located in hurricane-prone areas, and results are compared with results obtained by the procedure specified in the ASCE 7.98 Standard, which, for buildings, consists of applying a blanket directionality reduction factor Kd = 0.85 to wind effects obtained by disregarding directionality. The results show that, for significant numbers of buildings in hurricane-prone areas, the use of the ASCE procedure can result in the underestimation of wind effects corresponding to strength design. They also show that database-assisted design for wind loads offers the potential for significantly more risk-consistent, safer, and economical design for buildings with both known and unknown and unknown orientation.
Citation
Journal of Structural Engineering-ASCE
Volume
127
Issue
No. 8

Keywords

building technology, directionality (wind), extreme values, meteorology, structural engineering, wind

Citation

Rigato, A. , Chang, P. and Simiu, E. (2001), Database-Assisted Design, Standardization, and Wind Direction Effects - Closure, Journal of Structural Engineering-ASCE, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=860423 (Accessed April 14, 2024)
Created July 31, 2001, Updated October 12, 2021