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Current Distribution and Transition Width in Superconducting Transition-Edge Sensors

Published

Author(s)

Daniel S. Swetz, Douglas A. Bennett, Daniel R. Schmidt, Joel N. Ullom

Abstract

Present models of the superconducting-to-normal transition in transition-edge sensors (TESs)do not describe the current distribution within a biased TES. This distribution is complicated by normal-metal features that are integral to TES design. We present a model with one free parameter that describes the evolution of the current distribution with bias. To probe the current distribution experimentally, we fabricated TES devices with di erent current return geometries. Devices where the current return geometry mirrors current flow within the device have sharper transitions thus allowing for a direct test of the current ow model. Measurements from these devices show that current meanders through a TES low in the resistive transition but ows across the normal-metal features by 40 percent of the normal-state resistance. Comparison of transition sharpness between device designs reveals that self-induced magnetic elds play an important role in determining the width of the superconducting transition.
Citation
Physical Review Letters
Volume
101
Issue
24

Keywords

superconducting sensor, magnetic fields, transition width

Citation

Swetz, D. , Bennett, D. , Schmidt, D. and Ullom, J. (2012), Current Distribution and Transition Width in Superconducting Transition-Edge Sensors, Physical Review Letters, [online], https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4771984 (Accessed June 20, 2024)

Issues

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Created December 13, 2012, Updated November 10, 2018