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Combined error signal in Ramsey spectroscopy of clock transitions

Published

Author(s)

V. I. Yudin, A. V. Taichenachev, M. Y. Basalaev, T. Zanon-Willette, James Wesley Y. Pollock, Moshe Shuker, Elizabeth A. Donley, John E. Kitching

Abstract

We have developed a universal method to form the reference signal for the stabilization of arbitrary atomic clocks based on Ramsey spectroscopy that uses an interrogation scheme of the atomic system with two different Ramsey periods and a specially constructed combined error signal (CES) computed by subtracting two error signals with the appropriate calibration factor. CES spectroscopy allows for perfect elimination of probe-induced light shifts and does not suffer from the effects of relaxation, time-dependent pulse fluctuations and phase-jump modulation errors and other non-idealities of the interrogation procedure. The method is simpler than recently developed autobalanced Ramsey spectroscopy techniques [Ch. Sanner, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 120, 053602 (2018); V. I. Yudin, et al., Phys. Rev. Appl. 9, 054034 (2018)], because it uses a single error signal that feeds back on the clock frequency. CES universal technique can be applied to many applications of precision spectroscopy.
Citation
Physical Review A

Keywords

Atomic Clocks, Precision Measurements, Ramsey Spectroscopy

Citation

Yudin, V. , Taichenachev, A. , Basalaev, M. , Zanon-Willette, T. , Y., J. , Shuker, M. , Donley, E. and Kitching, J. (2018), Combined error signal in Ramsey spectroscopy of clock transitions, Physical Review A, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=926404 (Accessed September 17, 2021)
Created December 18, 2018, Updated February 1, 2019