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Collapse and revivals for systems of short-range phase coherence

Published

Author(s)

Khan W. Mahmud, Lei Jiang, Philip R. Johnson, Eite Tiesinga

Abstract

We predict the existence of novel collapse and revival oscillations that are a distinctive signature of the short-range off-diagonal coherence associated with particle-hole pairs in Mott insulator states. Starting with an atomic Mott state in a one-dimensional optical lattice, suddenly raising the lattice depth freezes the particle-hole pairs in place and induces phase oscillations. The peak of the quasi-momentum distribution, revealed through time of flight interference, oscillates between a maximum occupation at zero quasi-momentum (the $\Gamma$ point) and the edge of the Brillouin zone. We find that the population enhancements at the edge of the Brillouin zone is characteristic of coherent particle-hole pairs, and we show similar effects for fermions and Bose-Fermi mixtures in a lattice. Our results open a new avenue for probing strongly correlated many-body states with short-range phase coherence that goes beyond the familiar collapse and revivals previously observed in the long-range coherent superfluid regime.
Citation
New Journal of Physics
Volume
16

Keywords

Ultracold atoms, Mott insulators, Quantum dynamics, Strongly correlated matter

Citation

Mahmud, K. , Jiang, L. , Johnson, P. and Tiesinga, E. (2014), Collapse and revivals for systems of short-range phase coherence, New Journal of Physics, [online], https://doi.org/10.1088/1367-2630/16/10/103009, https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=915567 (Accessed July 23, 2024)

Issues

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Created October 6, 2014, Updated October 12, 2021