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Building Regulatory Systems in a Post-September 11 World.

Published

Author(s)

Richard W. Bukowski

Abstract

The September 11, 2001 attacks in the United States have initiated a significant discussion and rethinking among building regulators not only in the U.S., but also around the world. While most quickly state that regulations should not require that buildings be designed to resist impact by fully loaded aircraft, there is an active dialog on what have come to be called extreme events. Much of the discussion in the literature has focused on technical issues like structural fire resistance and progressive collapse, but there is a public policy debate that should precede and drive the engineering and design discussions. The purpose of this paper is to lay out some of these issues, such as expected response to extreme events; "target" buildings; standards of practice, qualifications, and ethics; regulation of existing buildings; management of risk; and others, and to hopefully start that policy debate.
Proceedings Title
Performance-Based Codes and Fire Safety Design Methods, 5th International Conference. Proceedings
Conference Dates
October 6-8, 2004

Keywords

performance based codes, fire codes, fire safety, building codes, safety engineering, regulations, terrorists, terrorism, World Trade Center, uncertainity, risk management, fire protection, building collapse, egress

Citation

Bukowski, R. (2004), Building Regulatory Systems in a Post-September 11 World., Performance-Based Codes and Fire Safety Design Methods, 5th International Conference. Proceedings, -1, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=916821 (Accessed April 20, 2024)
Created October 6, 2004, Updated February 17, 2017