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The Application of High-Speed CNC Machining to Prototype Production

Published

Author(s)

Tony L. Schmitz, Matthew A. Davies, Brian S. Dutterer, J C. Ziegert

Abstract

To reduce delays in the design and manufacture of a new part, rapid prototyping is often employed to minimize lead times. In this paper, the application of high-speed machining to the production of monolithic, metallic, functional prototypes is discussed and an example component with relevant process times (which appear to be competitive with other rapid prototyping processes) is presented. Fundamental requirements for the use of high-speed machining (a subtractive process) in rapid prototyping (normally considered an additive process) are identified. These requirements include: 1) high speed/high power spindles, 2) proper spindle speed selection based on the system dynamics, 3) machining parameter definition based on tool wear, 4) high feed/high acceleration machine drives, 5) intelligent path generation, and 6) pre-process verification of arbitrary three-dimensional CNC part paths. The implementation of the Simultaneous Trilateration Laser Ball Bar (STLBB) system to measure these contours is described and the device verification procedure is outlined.Example two and three-dimensional path measurements are also shown.
Citation
International Journal of Machine Tools and Manufacture
Volume
41
Issue
No. 8

Keywords

High-Speed Machining, Rapid prototyping

Citation

Schmitz, T. , Davies, M. , Dutterer, B. and Ziegert, J. (2001), The Application of High-Speed CNC Machining to Prototype Production, International Journal of Machine Tools and Manufacture (Accessed April 16, 2024)
Created May 31, 2001, Updated October 12, 2021