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Absorption Cross Section Measurements of a Human Body in a Reverberation Chamber

Published

Author(s)

Damir Senic, Antonio Sarolic, Zbigniew M. Joskiewicz, Christopher L. Holloway

Abstract

We provide the results of human body absorption cross section (ACS) measurements. The setup was based on the reverberation chamber as a well-known measurement environment capable of performing ACS measurements. The approach was supported by reference measurements on canonically shaped objects which were convenient for analytical (Mie scattering theory) ACS calculations. Measured ACS of canonical objects was in excellent agreement with calculated values. The ACS measurements of a human model was performed (1) on the real human body in the upright posture, and (2) on the cylindrical water model made of vertically stacked water-filled jugs. The cylindrical model had the same water content as an average human body. Comparison between these two models showed small difference in measured ACS within the measurement uncertainty of a setup. So, the cylindrical water model proved to be a useful artifact, especially for time consuming broadband ACS measurements.
Citation
IEEE Transactions on Electromagnetic Compatibility
Volume
58
Issue
3

Keywords

absorption cross section, absorption effectiveness, human exposure, loading, Q-factor, reverberation chamber

Citation

Senic, D. , Sarolic, A. , Joskiewicz, Z. and Holloway, C. (2016), Absorption Cross Section Measurements of a Human Body in a Reverberation Chamber, IEEE Transactions on Electromagnetic Compatibility, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=919943 (Accessed April 14, 2024)
Created February 8, 2016, Updated March 19, 2019