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Carl A. Miller ()

Mathematician

Carl A. Miller works in the Cryptographic Technologies Group at NIST and is also a Fellow of the Joint Center for Quantum Information Computer Science (QuICS) at the University of Maryland.  Dr. Miller specializes in quantum cryptography.  Before coming to NIST he worked as a postdoc and research fellow at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Click here for Carl Miller's homepage at QuICS.

Publications

The Mathematics of Quantum Coin-Flipping

Author(s)
Carl A. Miller
An expository article (aimed at the general mathematics community) about quantum cryptography and the philosophy of applied mathematics. The article focuses on

Lattice-Based Quantum Advantage from Rotated Measurements

Author(s)
Yusuf Alnawakhtha, Atul Mantri, Carl A. Miller, Daochen Wang
Trapdoor claw-free functions (TCFs) are immensely valuable in cryptographic interactions between a classical client and a quantum server. Typically, a protocol

Status Report on the Third Round of the NIST Post-Quantum Cryptography Standardization Process

Author(s)
Gorjan Alagic, Daniel Apon, David Cooper, Quynh Dang, Thinh Dang, John M. Kelsey, Jacob Lichtinger, Yi-Kai Liu, Carl A. Miller, Dustin Moody, Rene Peralta, Ray Perlner, Angela Robinson, Daniel Smith-Tone
The National Institute of Standards and Technology is in the process of selecting public-key cryptographic algorithms through a public, competition-like process

Status Report on the Third Round of the NIST Post-Quantum Cryptography Standardization Process

Author(s)
Gorjan Alagic, David Cooper, Quynh Dang, Thinh Dang, John M. Kelsey, Jacob Lichtinger, Yi-Kai Liu, Carl A. Miller, Dustin Moody, Rene Peralta, Ray Perlner, Angela Robinson, Daniel Smith-Tone, Daniel Apon
The National Institute of Standards and Technology is in the process of selecting public-key cryptographic algorithms through a public, competition-like process
Created August 15, 2019, Updated December 8, 2022