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National Institute of Standards and Technology Recognizes Staff Achievements

For Immediate Release: December 5, 2012

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Contact: Jennifer Huergo
301-975-6343

GAITHERSBURG, Md.—The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recognized current and former employees in an awards ceremony Dec. 5 at its Gaithersburg campus. Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards and Technology and NIST Director Patrick Gallagher and other officials presented the NIST awards. They also recognized recipients of the U.S. Department of Commerce Gold and Silver medals, who will receive their awards in a separate ceremony.

Bronze Medal Award for Superior Federal Service
Forty-four employees received the highest honor presented by NIST. Since 1966, the award has been given for significant performance characterized by outstanding or significant contributions that have increased the efficiency and effectiveness of NIST.

Richard Allen – “For leadership in ensuring the reliability of MEMS devices in life-critical applications through the development and validation of needed standards.”

Richard Ayers – “For scientific achievement in the development of mobile forensics test methods and reference data.”

Michael Blackmon – “For professional excellence in leading NIST's environmental management programs and minimizing the impact of NIST's activities on the environment.”

Marcus Cicerone – “For inventing and developing broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy for rapid 3D spectral imaging of cells and advanced materials.”

Christian Enloe – “For outstanding leadership resulting in the implementation of a more rigorous and effective IT security assessment and authorization program.”

Carolyn (Becky) Hill – “For working with industry to develop measurement methods that ensure accuracy and comparability of kits for paternity tests and forensic DNA analysis.”

Steven Hudson – “For leading the development of innovative microfluidic methods to measure the rheological properties of complex fluids.”

Stephen Jennison – “For leadership and management in upgrading and expanding the NIST Central Plant cooling capacity.”

Brian Kirby – “For the elucidation of complex magnetic coupling in ferromagnetic, semiconducting multilayers using innovative polarized neutron reflectivity methods.”

Ya-Shian Li-Baboud – “For development of a time synchronization conformance and interoperability test bed to assure compliance to critical requirements of the Smart Grid.”

Samuel Manzello – “For pioneering research into ember ignition and development of the standard firebrand generator for characterizing the fire resistance of building materials, structures, and communities to wildland fire embers.”

Mike Martin – “For exceptional leadership and service in the implementation of a highly successful leadership development program.”

Anzor Mikaia – “For leading the enhancement of quality and comprehensiveness of the NIST Mass Spectral Library.”

Thomas Nelson – “For leadership in helping to ensure the reliability of the emerging Smart Grid through establishing the world’s first synchrometrology test bed.”

William Ratcliff, Jr. – “For his achievements in elucidating the magnetic and ferroelectric properties of BiFeO3, the leading contender for new spintronics technologies.”

Thomas Silva – “For pioneering research and measurement tools that have advanced the understanding of magnetization dynamics and are enabling new magnetic devices.”

Glenn Solomon – “For establishing the fundamental science and demonstrating the feasibility of quantum photonic devices needed for quantum communication and metrology.”

Juana Williams – “For positioning the United States to commercialize hydrogen as an alternative vehicle fuel through her leadership in creating a legal metrology infrastructure.”

Dawn Bailey and Christine Schaefer – “For authoring and editing Baldrige 20/20, a book that shapes Baldrige Award winners' success stories into a strong case for U.S. senior executives’ use of the Baldrige Criteria.”

David Howe and Craig Nelson – “For development of a world-leading program of research and measurement services in phase noise to support industry and national priorities.”

Amanda Moors and Rebecca Pugh – “For developing a chain-of-custody biorepository program to support NOAA’s natural resources damage assessment of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.”

John Antonishek, David Kustaborder, and Matthew Loebach – “For the outstanding efforts in responding to significant and persistent cyber security incidents, minimizing the impact to NIST programs.”

Matthew Aronoff (former employee), Yee-Yin Choong, Ross Micheals, Brian Stanton, and Mary Frances Theofanos – “For successful, innovative, user-centered design leading to improved usability/portability for next-generation mobile, handheld biometric devices.”

Bruce Benner, Dan Dender, Mike Kelley, Adrian Mitchell, and Carol Wood – “For improving the safety, efficiency, and effectiveness of the compressed gas program.”

Jason Birkhimer, Joseph Boone, Robert Densock, James Fowler, Terri Gladhill, Joseph Luptak, and Cynthia Shugars – “For re-engineering and expanding NIST’s Central Computing Facility to meet NIST’s high performance-computing and mission operations needs.”

Eugene Casson Crittenden Award
The Crittenden Award, established in 1967, recognizes superior achievement by permanent employees who perform supporting services that have a significant impact on technical programs beyond their own offices.

Percival Bangwa – “For consistently providing reliable and cost-effective shipping services to the NIST community.”

Joseph Carbone – “For his exceptional performance in overseeing and monitoring Boulder construction projects from start to finish.”

Kevin Dewees – “For his accomplishments at NIST, along with his technical knowledge of HVAC design, troubleshooting, preventive maintenance, and installation procedures.”

James Fort – “For exceptional efforts for and dedication to material preparation and logistical support for the Standard Reference Material Program.”

Annie Smith – “For consistently exceeding expectations to provide the support most needed for the broadest benefit of NIST, regardless of organizational boundaries.”

Gabrielle Sun – “For extraordinary administrative support and customer service in the areas of training and employee development.”

Durwin Thomas – “For his technical knowledge and ability in design, preventative maintenance, and troubleshooting of the control systems for over 500 HVAC units across the campus.”

Allen V. Astin Measurement Science Award
The Astin Award, first presented in 1984, is granted for outstanding achievement in the advancement of measurement science or in the delivery of measurement services.

Marla Dowell – “For visionary leadership of the world’s most comprehensive laser metrology program.”

Judson C. French Award
The French award, first presented in 2000, is granted for significant improvement in products delivered directly to industry, including new or improved NIST calibration services, Standard Reference Materials and Standard Reference Databases.

Vincent Hackley – “For delivery of standard reference materials and documentary standards for measurements of nanomaterials in biomedical and environmental applications.”

Cameron Miller and Timothy Rasinski – “For providing the framework for solid-state lighting commerce through the first-ever accreditation and measurement assurance programs.”

Christopher Cromer, John Lehman, and Xiaoyu Li – “For pioneering traceable, high-power laser metrology, leading to the world’s most accurate and precise characterization of multi-kilowatt lasers.”

Jacob Rabinow Applied Research Award
The Rabinow Award, first presented in 1975, is granted for outstanding achievements in the practical application of the results of scientific engineering research.

Glenn Forney, Randall McDermott, and Kevin McGrattan – “For outstanding technical achievement in the practical application of fire science research to create innovative and practical engineering tools for the cost-effective fire-safe design of structures.”

Edward Bennett Rosa Award
The Rosa Award, established in 1964, is granted for outstanding achievement in or contributions to the development of meaningful and significant engineering, scientific or documentary standards either within NIST or in cooperation with other government agencies or private groups.

Loren Goodrich (retired) – “For sustained technical excellence and leadership in the development of protocols and international standards for superconductor metrology.”

William P. Slichter Award
The Slichter Award, first presented in 1992, is granted for outstanding achievements by NIST staff in building or strengthening ties between NIST and industry.

Barbara Lippiatt – “For working with industry to implement innovative metrics and tools for product sustainability assessment.”

Samuel Wesley Stratton Award
The Stratton Award, first presented in 1962, is granted for outstanding scientific or engineering achievements in support of NIST objectives.

Joseph Stroscio – “For scientific achievements in developing new atomic-scale measurement methods involving low- and ultralow temperature scanning tunneling microscopy.”

George A. Uriano Award
The Uriano Award, first presented in 1996, is granted for outstanding achievements by NIST staff in building or strengthening NIST extramural programs, with emphasis on fostering U.S. competitiveness and business excellence.

Mark Shapiro – “For outstanding leadership and management of the Baldrige Award evaluation process and redesign and implementation of selection and training for the 2012 Board of Examiners.”

NIST Colleagues’ Choice Award
Established in 2006, the Colleagues’ Choice Award is granted to non-supervisory employees who are recognized and nominated by their colleagues for having made significant contributions that broadly advance the NIST mission and strategic goals or broadly contribute to the overall health and effectiveness of NIST.

Santiago “Sam” Ayala – “For proactively pursuing solutions with stellar customer service and development and implementation of the nitrogen metering project.”

James Beall – “For selfless dedication and outstanding work in creating a microfabrication facility that will enable research for hundreds in years to come.”

Randy Schroyer – “For extraordinary commitment to customer service through efficiently satisfying the contracting requirements needed to accomplish NIST’s objectives.”

Kimberly Tomasi – “For oversight in development, organization, and upkeep of 12 laboratories and the design and maintenance of the laboratory safety program.”

Director’s Award for Excellence in Administration
The Director’s Award was first presented in 2008 and is granted to recognize administrative professionals who have made significant contributions that broadly advance the NIST mission and strategic goals through excellence in administrative services and functions.

Neil Alderoty – “For the collaborative creation of numerous institute-wide administrative practices that address the multifaceted, complex needs of NIST.”

Safety Award
The NIST Safety Award, first established in 1979, is granted to recognize NIST employees and organizations for substantial contributions to improving safety at NIST.

Matthew Bundy, Anthony Chakalis, Artur Chernovsky, Laurean DeLauter, and Doris Rinehart – “For improving safety at the National Fire Research Laboratory and for creating a safety culture that strives for incident prevention.”

BioSafety Working Group - (Organization Award): Jamie Almeida, Mary Bedner, Jeanne Houston, Nancy Lin, Jayne Morrow, Darwin Reyes-Hernandez, Mary Satterfield, Carl Simon, Christopher Szakal, Kimberly Tomasi, Alessandro Tona – “For developing and promoting biosafety training and awareness for NIST staff.”

CNST NanoFab (Organization Award): James Bittner, Jerry Bowser, Laurence Buck (retired), Marc Cangemi, Lei Chen, Matthew Gonzales, Russell Hajdaj, Wade Hall, Gerard Henein, Richard Kasica, Vincent Luciani, Alline Myers, Jeff Pasternak, Matthew Robinson, Joshua Schumacher, Kerry Siebein, William Young (former employee), and Liya Yu – “For establishing and implementing an outstanding safety program in the NanoFab that protects the safety of researchers from industry, academia, NIST, and other government agencies, who range from scientific novices to experts in nanofabrication.”

U.S. Department of Commerce Gold Medal Award for Distinguished Service
First presented in 1949, this is the highest honor conferred upon an employee of the U.S. Department of Commerce. It is bestowed for “distinguished performance characterized by extraordinary, notable or prestigious contributions that impact the mission of the Department of Commerce and/or one operating unit and which reflect favorably on the Department.” Awards are given in the following categories: leadership, personal and professional excellence, scientific/engineering achievement, organizational development, customer service, administrative/technical support, and heroism.

Timothy Halton (along with colleagues from other Department of Commerce organizations) – “For utilizing innovative private-sector strategies to drive down the costs of computers by 40 percent and improve services delivered to Commerce customers.”

Peter Mohr, Barry Taylor (retired), and Edwin Williams (retired) – “For leading an international effort to craft the most significant redefinition of the Système International (SI or Metric System) in the past 50 years.”

James Beall, Gene Hilton, Kent Irwin, Carl Reintsema, Joel Ullom, and Leila Vale – “For creating the world’s largest and most powerful submillimeter astronomical camera to probe the origins of planets, stars and galaxies.”

Leonard Hanssen, B. Carol Johnson, Maritoni Litorja, Joseph Rice, Eric Shirley, and Allan Smith – “For overcoming longstanding challenges in ensuring accuracy of the longest unbroken satellite climate record through rigorous measurement science.”

U.S. Department of Commerce Silver Medal Award for Exceptional Service
The second highest honor awarded by the U.S. Department of Commerce, it is bestowed for “exceptional performance characterized by noteworthy or superlative contributions that have a direct and lasting impact within the Department.” Awards are given in the following categories: leadership, personal and professional excellence, scientific/engineering achievement, organizational development, customer service, administrative/technical support, and heroism. The award was initiated in 1949.

Jannet Cancino (along with colleagues from other Department of Commerce organizations) - “For developing 56 federal-state partnerships, a network of state leaders stimulating economic growth, and the first broadband availability datasets.”

Mark Iadicola – “For seminal metrological contributions to aging steel bridge life prediction through a joint FHWA/NIST study of gusset connections.”

Nelson Bryner and Anthony Putorti – “For advancing scientific understanding of the Charleston Sofa Super Store fire, improving life safety and reducing fire losses.”

Patricia Harris and Erik Puskar (along with colleagues from other Department of Commerce organizations) – “For leadership excellence in delivering high-level standards outcomes for APEC 2011 USA Host Year that advanced the department’s trade priorities.”

John Kucklick and Michele Schantz – “For quality assurance of measurements critical to the federal government’s natural resource damage assessment of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.”

Steven Cundiff, Bryan Faktor, Thomas O'Brian, Kent Rochford (former employee), and Stephen Salber – “For leadership in spearheading new facilities at the NIST-Boulder and JILA-CU campuses to enable world-leading scientific advances for decades to come.”

Steven Grantham, Shannon Hill, Thomas Lucatorto, Lee Richter, and Charles Tarrio – “For advancing extreme ultraviolet radiation measurement (EUV) science and measurement services critical to the commercialization of EUV lithography.”

Robert Fletcher, J. Greg Gillen, Marcela Najarro, Jessica Staymates, Matthew Staymates, Jennifer Verkouteren, R. Michael Verkouteren, and Eric Windsor – “For development of a national measurement and standards infrastructure to optimize and standardize trace explosive detectors for homeland security.”