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eVCCTL Software

Description/Summary:

(Return to Cement Hydration and Degradation Modeling Software)

The educational version of the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory (eVCCTL) software provides a virtual testing laboratory environment that can be used by concrete scientists, engineers, and technologists to explore the properties of cement paste and concrete materials. With this software the user can

  • create virtual materials, using carefully characterized cement powders, supplementary cementitious materials, fillers, and aggregates;
  • simulate the curing of these materials under a wide range of conditions; and
  • calculate their thermal, mechanical, and transport properties as a function of their processing

This software was developed as part of the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory project.


New in Version 2.2

  • Improved compatibility with non-English operating systems
  • Full flexibility in specifying target water-to-solids mass ratio of cementitious binder
  • Calculate relative conductivity of cement paste, mortar, or concrete

 

Sample Screenshots:

Virtual aggregate repository page

Virtual aggregate repository page, Drop down menu to select source, Source image on left, Shape data on right

 

Virtual cement repository page

VCCTL cement page, Inventory, Name drop down, Segmented SEM image, Cement data

 

Virtual measurements page

VCCTL plotting, Set axes, Hydration name, Property, showing plot result

Details

Version: 2.2

Last Updated: December 13, 2011

Type of software: virtual testing of cement and concrete materials

System/Platform:

 

Operating system:
Windows XP Service Pack 3, Windows Vista, Windows 7
Memory: Minimum 4 GB RAM (8 GB or 16 GB preferred); installed software uses 1 GB of hard disk storage
Installed software:
Java Development Kit (JDK) 6 Update 20 or later (Note: Not compatible with JDK 7); Mozilla Firefox web browser, version 3 or later


Download information:

The eVCCTL software can be downloaded as a single executable installer. The installer is a 171 MB file and may take several minutes to download. 

Download

References/Credits/Disclaimers:

The algorithms, procedures, and computer programs available here constitute a prototype system for a virtual laboratory for the testing of cement and concrete. They have been compiled from the best knowledge and understanding currently available, but have important limitations that must be understood and considered by the user. The eVCCTL system is intended for use by persons competent in the field of cement-based materials and with some familiarity with computers. It is intended as an aid in the materials selection, optimization, and design process.

This software was developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology by employees of the federal government in the course of their official duties. Pursuant to Title 17 Section 105 of the United States Code this software is not subject to copyright protection and is in the public domain. eVCCTL is an experimental system. NIST assumes no responsibility whatsoever for its use by other parties, and makes no guarantees, expressed or implied, about its quality, reliability, or any other characteristic. We would appreciate acknowledgment if the software is used.

The U.S. Department of Commerce makes no warranty, expressed or implied, to users of eVCCTL and associated computer programs, and accepts no responsibility for its use. Users of the VCCTL assume sole responsibility under federal law for determine the appropriateness of its use in any particular application; for any conclusions drawn from the results of its use; and for any actions taken or not taken as a result of analyses performed using these tools.

Users are warned that eVCCTL is intended for use only by those competent in the field of cement-based materials and is intended only to supplement the informed judgment of the qualified user. The software package contains computer models which may or may not have predictive value when applied to a specific set of factual circumstances. Lack of accurate predictions by the models could lead to erroneous conclusions with regard to materials selection and design. All results should be evaluated by an informed user.

Contact
Jeffrey W. Bullard
(301) 975-5725